Neck Surgery Recovery Update

My neck surgery on Friday was a success.

It was more complicated than expected (2.5 hours under instead of the planned 45-60 minutes). The cyst had grown much larger than anticipated and was interwoven between lots of muscle and attached itself all over, including my spine. It was removed, unruptured, and the muscles rebuilt to hopefully fill in the void without too much of an indentation.

I have a large line of stitches but the hope is it should heal without too much of a scar. I’ll see the doctor in two weeks for a checkup and have been taking it easy with a lot of bed rest. Overall, the pain has been pretty manageable, the area is mostly just tight feeling.

Cabin fever is totally setting in and I’m looking forward to getting out of the apartment later this week. Plan to do IndyHall one day and then Side Project Saturday with the CocoaHeads.

I know I owe a bunch of people lunch and or happy hour drinks. If you want to get together let me know.

Fever Dreams

While I had hopes of doing more productive things, I ended up spending the last few days in bed fighting off a pretty lousy sinus / chest cold.

Between the medicines and the fever, I don’t think I had more than 90 consecutive minutes of sleep. The dreams were awful too. Not like vivid/scary but it was as if I’m trying to solve an algebra problem and the rules don’t make sense. Sometimes I had these really long dreams and then I’d wake up only to find I was asleep for an hour or so.

Nothing like being sick to help remind you to appreciate the importance of your health.

Anyways, I’m on the mend and taking some antibiotics to help make sure my system is clean for Friday’s neck surgery. I’m hopeful the recovery of that will be easier than this past weekend. I think it should be.

On Thursday we’ve got CocoaHeads! I’ll be there to MC but will probably take it easy at the bar afterwords for obvious reasons.

Finally, I want to take a quick moment to say thanks to everyone who reached out to me regarding my unemployment news from last week. I really appreciate the well wishes and leads. Getting that kind of response really helps put my stress at ease. Thanks so much.

“For the times they are a-changing”

I am no longer an employee of Big Nerd Ranch. The news came down on Monday. I can’t speak to any of the details but suffice to say I am disappointed. I really enjoyed working at BNR. My time there was productive, for my own personal growth as well as that of my students and clients. I wish them well, and continue to recommend them as a good source for iOS education.

So, what’s next for me?

On the immediate horizon, I’m a bit focused on my neck surgery, which is on Feb 10th. Its been scheduled since November. The goal is to remove a large cyst on the back of my neck. I will be put under for this surgery, so tomorrow I have to get a bunch of blood work and X-rays done.

For work, I open to ideas. Generally speaking I’m unlikely to make long term plans and would probably prefer to take on some smaller consulting work. I’d like to steep a bit on my long term options. If you have anyone who might be in need for an experienced iOS or Mac developer, let me know. Thanks for your help.

Dongle Emotions

After letting my bedroom / office get out of hand, I took some time today to clean up and get organized. I wrapped and grouped up my wires and even opened up some of the new USB3/Thunderbolt3 dongles I had ordered to go along with my new MacBook Pro order.

Now I don’t want to get into the current dongle drama surrounding the new MacBook Pro — but I do have a funny story.

A few years ago I worked as a self-employed contractor doing iOS work. I was at a meeting with a new prospective client. Overall the meeting went well and it looked like we’d be working together. At the end I was packing up all my gear and there was an accusation that I had taken their projector dongle. I was fairly certain I was in the right and this was a dongle from my laptop bag but did I really want to risk this multi-month contract for a $30 dongle? It was something out of a Seinfeld episode. Suffice to say, I left the dongle with the client that day to ease tensions.

Don’t mess with another man’s dongle.

These days I mark all my dongles (and I need a ton of them as a traveling instructor not knowing what a room will have) with “ZORN” to alleviate confusion.

A Few Dental Stories Amongst Subscribers

One of my guilty (and time consuming) pleasures is YouTube.

I watch a lot of YouTube. Mostly video game and movie stuff, lots of WoW channels (even though I’m not playing much right now), a few Let’s Players and of course all of the upcoming Pokemon Sun and Moon hype.

Well overtime, you really come to connect with these hosts, many of which have stories of historically working hard service jobs to now, finally being able to do something they love for a living. You root for these people. Sometimes a life event happens to them, and since they are already sharing so much they share that too.

Yesterday I watched a video from a wise cracking WoW player by the name of Asmongold. In it he shared his ongoing trouble with his teeth, his early inability to treat it, his shame of the problem, the trouble it’s caused and how he is on the path to get things fixed. It hit home for me as I’m in the same boat.

My Own Dental Story

When I was working for myself, I was making money but not tons of money. I had emergency medical insurance when I first started but no dental. In fact growing up we didn’t have enough money for dental so I didn’t see a dentist much past early high school. While my teeth were out of alignment there was no major debilitation. For a while, outside of some embarrassment from the alignment problems it wasn’t that a big deal.

One day while attending a Phillies game we went out for a pre-game dinner. That night was the first fallen domino for me. I bit down on something and cracked my back right molar. I did not see a dentist as I didn’t really have a lot of extra money and in all honesty at this point there was a bit of fear in me about doctor’s in general. I let the problem grow and over time other teeth started to break down.

Fast forward to this year. Once again I had another event, a newly cracked tooth and this time a very painful result. Unfortunately when the pain really started to kick in I was on the road. There wasn’t much I could do outside of Advil and trying to keep the tooth clean with salt water. On the one Thursday I was in so much pain I almost didn’t show up to teach my class. It was a wake up call. I did not want to let this problem which I had procrastinated about for so long interfere with my new teaching job.

When I got home I looked through my employee dental coverage and made arrangements to see a dentist. It took even more time to really start to feel better. The first session was a general consultation, a full mouth set of x-rays to see where I stood. Unsurprisingly, I needed a lot of work. At least a few root canals and at least one extraction/implant (that first cracked molar from years ago, which by this point was ruined). On the second trip we did the first root canal and while the time in the dentist chair was not pleasant it (and a set of antibiotics to help with the infection) did come to quell my pain and I was really happy.

Since then I’ve had a second root canal, build up of the two teeth, and a surgery of the gum to prepare for one of crowns that needs more room. Today, I’m kind of in an awkward state where I have one temporary crown and one tooth “open” to let the gum surgery heal. I have to eat on one side of my mouth (which takes a ton of mental energy btw) and I can’t brush the top left set of teeth (only rinse with a prescription liquid). I’m set to do the two crown molds in another week from now. After that, they’ll take about two weeks to come back in the mail and finally have them installed.

It’s a long process, of which I’m really only just beginning — and yeah, very expensive. I am happy though to be finally on the road to improvement.

Why post this? For one, I’d like to share the story with Asmongold just to say, I’m with ya man — keep up the recovery.

For anyone else who might be in a similar situation, I’ll say this, do try to get your teeth cleaned and/or fixed as soon as possible. It really sucks that it’s so expensive but it’s something that time will only make worse. I do wish I had reached out to my family about the problem and been more proactive about it in the past. I’m sure I would have gotten some support from them to make it happen sooner. If you have people to lean on, don’t be stubborn like me, let them help you. Good luck and feel better soon.

Closing Thoughts on Big Nerd Ranch’s Front End Web Class

I posted a few thoughts while I was attending the Front End Web class last week and I figured I’d put a cap on it with some final thoughts.

Disclaimer: If you happen to find this post and don’t know, I do in fact work for Big Nerd Ranch, so yes I’m partial but these are still my honest opinions.

Who is this class for?

Like other BNR books and classes, there is an expectation of some experience. You don’t need to be an expert by any means for this class but you should be comfortable with the basics of web design, hosting and how the web works. If you are looking for these beginner skills I’d recommend Code School and/or Code Academy.

With the basics taken care of, this class provides an accelerated but thorough tour of modern web development and the toolchains that you need to know. The class is great for people like myself, who have a history of web development but have been out of the game for a few years or mostly focused on the backend systems. Others who would find value include those who are looking to jumpstart a new web skill set for a new job or project.

Having a full week to escape the distractions of work and personal obligations really enables you to focus on the class at hand. Combine this with guided lectures and an experienced instructor to answer questions and discuss patterns, really elevates the value to “priceless”.

The Syllabus

The table of contents titles don’t really do justice to the details of each chapter. In total we build four separate projects:

  • The first had us work with HTML5, CSS and JavaScript to do a moderately complex layout of a slideshow like page that included animations, responsive layout and modern markup techniques.
  • The second project was a Coffee Order system the helped us use HTML5 forms, Bootstrap styles, and JavaScript to communicate with a backend via AJAX.
  • The third project was a chat app, that utilized web sockets. For this app we not only built the front end but the backend too, in Node.js.
  • The fourth and final project was an EmberJS app that would have us catalog monster sightings. Ember is a big framework but I think the book does a fair introduction. We got to work with a relationship of models, and executed all the big features.

I thought the chapter and project progression went really well. There are some who might prefer to end with Angular or React instead of Ember but the good thing to know is the early class concepts give you a great JavaScript foundation to build on so you’ll be empowered to experiment with all of those projects and more over time.

That is a core value of Big Nerd Ranch classes that I really agree with. They teach you from the bottom up so you can understand how things work and not just how to assemble/configure things.

The Extras

There is lots of open lab time at night. You are encouraged to bring a side project to work on. While I did make some progress on my own project, an Ember Wiki project (I have some basic models and forms working, all backed up my a Firebase persistence layer), I did have to dedicate some lab time to the book itself to make sure I kept up.

In the afternoons we’d have time for a walk around the resort and on some of the days we even arranged for a shuttle van to take us to some of the exhibits, like the Birds of Prey and the Butterfly Center. Considering how focused we are during the class, these excursions are very welcome and a great way to clear your head and get a second wind.

Final Thoughts

If you want to learn a new technology, in this case Front End Web Development, and in particular if there is a time-sensitive nature to your needs it’s hard to imagine a better environment than a Big Nerd Ranch class. The ticket price does include lodging and food for the week so keep that in mind when shopping around or putting together a formal company request. If you have any questions, feel free to contact training support. They’ll be happy to help you out.

Clash of the Coders: Day 0

One of the many interesting benefits I get working for Big Nerd Ranch is the opportunity to participate in many fun and unique events. One of the bigger ones is called Clash of the Coders.

Clash of the Coders is an annual coding competition, whereby Big Nerd Ranch effectively “shuts down” for a a few days to allow developers to flex their coding muscles in to build something (anything) that is both wizardly and useful.

This years edition of “Clash” starts at 6pm tonight, Wednesday March 30th. While people are encouraged to brainstorm ideas and form teams ahead of time, no code shall be written until the event starts.

During the event we are treated to full time catering, shoulder and neck massages as well as other free-form geek activities. (I hear Christian will have his new Oculus Rift around for testing.)

While remote nerds can choose to stay remote and participate, anyone who wants to come into the office can. Last year I was at home and didn’t really get into it. This year I’m working out of the office so I’m anxious to see how it all works out.

As for my project and team, I’m still working on it. I have an idea and if need be will work on it solo but am also hosting a meeting after lunch for ‘Clash Singles’ to see if we can form some last minute teams.

At the end of Clash (Saturday, 6pm) we have a nice BBQ dinner (spouses and kids welcome) and we run a science fair of sorts, where people demo their work and answer questions. People are judged on project complexity, presentation and other factors. Bonus points are awarded if your team was interdisciplinary (mixing people of different departments) and if you were able to integrate any of the emerging technologies on our watch list. Top prize allows you to choose from list of high end geeky toys (think drones and musical instruments) with second/third prizes getting some nice Amazon gift cards.

I’ll post more as Clash gets going. If you have any questions let me know.

Managing Remote Teams

Local company Wildbit has been nice enough to host a running series of meetup events focused on running a software business and all that it can entail. Last night we discussed Managing Remote Teams and as a remote employee myself I was interested to hear what others people had to share. Below are some of my notes.

Context

In attendance we had about 12 or so people. Many from Wildbit (many of their remote people were in town), but we also had a pair from another small (6+) local software company, one from a local company researching coworking and myself, whom works remotely for the Big Nerd Ranch, down in Atlanta.

General Observations

  • Running an all in-person office has unique organization challenges and benefits.
  • Running an all remote office has unique organization challenges and benefits.
  • Running a hybrid in-person and remote office has unique organization challenges and benefits.
  • Even still, things vary based on the size and work of your company.
  • No rules are true for everyone so be flexible.
  • Be prepared to spend time and energy on this.

Why Consider Remote Employees

  • Expands your potential hiring pool greatly.
  • Very helpful if you are using niche technologies where it can be hard to find experts (Closure, Rust, etc.).
  • Potential benefits in having time shifted work (but this can also introduce communication problems, lag).

How to Get Started

  • If you currently have a 100% in-person company, adding remote people will be a significant culture shift. Be prepared.
  • No one wants to be the first remote hire on a team.
  • Consider adding multiple remotes at once.
  • Consider offering work from home to current in-person staff to help the new culture work itself out.

Challenges

  • It can be hard for a remote employee to demonstrate what they are working on.
  • Being remote requires more thorough and regular communication than most people expect.
  • Lots of people romanticize remote work from DHH’s writings and don’t respect the real life challenges of it all.
  • Sometimes with a hybrid company, teams will be setup where you have two people “in office” and one person remote on a project. It can be real easy for the two people in office to share more face-to-face leaving the remote person feel left out.
  • If you have employees in different states / countries, you have to make sure you are following the approbate employment laws of those states / countries.
  • The whole “programming in your underwear” trope is really misguided. Most successful remote people have a schedule, take showers, get properly dressed and have a dedicated work spaces.

Face to Face Retreats

  • Everyone seemed to agree that it’s a bad idea for the remotes to never come together. Everyone benefits from real face to face time so plan for it early.
  • Wildbit has yearly company retreats, where they work, plan for the year ahead and otherwise define the goals and values that should guide all their decisions.
  • Other companies do more vacation oriented retreats to help connect people socially.
  • It was also suggested that depending on the size of the company it could benefit from have some company wide events and then some smaller more team focused events.

Things You Can Do to Help Remote Employees

  • Setup a Slack or HipChat for communication.
    • Additionally try to have people communicate what they are doing. “Starting feature X”, Reviewing PR Y”, “Stepping out to get some coffee”, “Breaking for an hour to watch a conference talk” — sharing these can help people better understand what’s going on.
  • Consider giving them an annual office stipend to improve their workspace; equivalent to the money you’d spend giving them an office in your building.
  • Make sure all in-office systems are available to remote folks. Things like file servers, whitelisted IP API access, etc.
  • Prefer video chat over audio chat. Seeing human faces helps communication and empathy.
  • When running a video chat, consider having even the in-office people stay at their desk and connect to give every “virtual head” its own space. (I’ve also had everyone use their laptop for the video and a shared phone for the voice.
  • If you are presenting and the video is going out to remote people, don’t forget to ask them for questions and check the chat room.
  • If you are a manager and are set up to have 1:1 monthly meetings with in-office people, consider offering bi-weekly for remotes — since they might be more out of sync.

Equipment

  • Some people were enjoying the HighFive video conferencing hardware — though they needed more seats than the current solution offers for their company wide stuff.
  • BNR’s recently been using the YouTube Live service to stream and capture video with fair success for our larger meetings / internal educational talks.
  • One AV tool BNR uses is a toss-able chat box that contains a microphone so after large meetings, during Q and A, the remote folks can hear the questions being asked.
  • The Double was brought up reguarding its use as a virtual presence. It’s cool stuff but of questionable return value.

Hope you enjoyed my notes. If you have anything to share about your own remote work let me know.

Philly CocoaHeads: History

Being the lead organizer of the Philly chapter of CocoaHeads, I always welcome the opportunity to chat with members of other meetups. It’s great to compare notes on how we run our groups, what’s worked and what’s failed. In particular I’ve recently chatted with the leadership of the Nashville CocoaHeads and was also able to attend an Atlanta CocoaHeads meeting while visiting Big Nerd Ranch. It was a great experience and has me inspired to capture some of my thoughts here on the blog. This first article is a walk down memory lane to document the history of Philly CocoaHeads.

Getting Started

The Philly chapter of CocoaHeads started out of IndyHall in 2008. IndyHall is a coworking space, a place for people who can work from home but choose not to; perhaps because they want a work/home separation or just to participate in the greater creative community. Back then IndyHall was still fairly young but had attracted together a strong tech following including:

  • Andy Mroczkowski and Far McKon who were working for the local company Neat, and their Mac software / scanner combo.
  • Jason Allum who was working on RipIt (which would later be sold to The Little App Factory).
  • Dave Martorana who had a few apps, including MultiFirefox and Multiplex (a media server app ahead of its time).
  • Joah Aas, who worked for the Mozilla organization and is now most known for his help with the Let’s Encrypt project.
  • Randy Zauhar, a local professor teaching Bioinformatics and Chemistry at University of Sciences. Randy had previous help run and host a group called: PHAD, Philadelphia Apple Developers.
  • And myself. I was a basic IndyHall member and was working on ProfitTrain updates at the time.

Philadelphia Apple Developers (PHAD) never grew to be anything very large but I remember it fondly. It would usually be about 4-6 of us sharing a pizza and showing each other our Cocoa projects. I vividly remember Randy showing off his spreadsheet app which listed chemical equations on one side and then had an OpenGL cell rendering the compositions on the other. I also remember doing talks on Subversion and then Core Data. Again, they were small meetings but having even a few people who were interested in or working in Cocoa back then to bounce ideas off was a huge win.

The early meetings of our group were ran by Andy Mroczkowski and actually marketed under the name PhillyCocoa and not CocoaHeads. The meetings were very demo heavy with lots of roundtable questions and discussions filling in the cracks. Some members took to working on a side project, a calculator, outside of the meeting. The project didn’t get too far but the remanence of it have been preserved on GitHub.

Early IndyHall

This is a photo of IndyHall, Strawberry Street Edition. The first “CocoaHeads” meeting was held in that back meeting hut.

As the iOS SDK (or iPhone SDK as it was called back then) was announced there was a serge in new members and interest in the group. The biggest hurdle seemed to be Objective-C itself so we planned and ran a workshop.

Over two Saturdays, mixing lecture time and coding exercises from Learn Objective-C on the Mac, by Mark Dalrymple, Scott Knaster we got 12 or so people a head start on iPhone programming.

New Leadership

Meetings continued, now at IndyHall’s new home on 3rd Street (or N3RD Street as it would come to be known as). Eventually a December meeting was announced and Andy let it be know that if you were interested in the future of PhillyCocoa to attend. At the meeting Andy announced his upcoming departure to head to San Fransisco to be apart of a startup. Two volunteers came forward to help organize the group in his stead, myself and Mike Deaven.

Meeting Format Changes

Over the next year me and Mike enacted a handful of changes we’d hope improve the group.

An Early IndyHall Meeting

One immediate change we did was move the website to WordPress. Previously Andy had a custom Ruby CMS / publish thing going and it wasn’t easily portable. I was able to get all of the old post converted into WordPress. The main goal here being enable multiple people to post and not have the code be machine dependent.

Another change was subtle, but I started to embrace the CocoaHeads brand in our naming and introductions. I always was aware of them and to me it seemed helpful to take the name and have our chapter listed on the main global site.

We also started to fiddle with the meeting format itself. Moving the pizza / social time to the front end of the meeting. This helped since we usually had a lot of stragglers arrive between 6:30 and 7:00, so by having the pizza upfront we could make sure to start the meeting with everyone present.

I also started to be a little more rigid in the introductions, making sure to repeat the basics of the group, who we were, what we did, when we met. I wanted new people to quickly get a sense of expectations.

Another IndyHall Meeting

The hardest thing back then was getting people to do talks. There were many meetings in the early days where we did not have a formal speaker and so it was on my shoulders to build a presentation to keep the group entertained. It was a lot of work but I think a major reason why we were later became more successful. I think it’s incredibly important to be consistent, to have that meeting every 2nd Thursday no matter what. Setting up that pattern and not giving into canceling meetings really helped solidify the group.

To help spur talks we started to request smaller commitments, show and tell time. A short talk or demo usually 5-15m in length. Much less to prepare and much less anxiety. It started slow but eventually kicked off a pattern of people coming forward to do talks, even “main” talks.

Adding Members through Meetup.com

Up to this point Philly CocoaHeads did not promote itself too much. You heard about it through word of mouth or via IndyHall announcements. Looking to grow the community we decided to join Meetup.com for more exposure. It took a few months to get going but eventually started to bring in tons of new faces. Meetings quickly grew from about 10-12 people, closer to 20-25.

As of today we have about 870 registered members on Meetup.com. Now most of them are not active members. I’d guess if you defined “active” as participated in a group event sometime in the last 12 months, you’d probably end up with ~200 members.

Alfie joins us from NY via a Double

Alfie joins us from NY via a Double.

New Events and Expanding the Leadership

When iOS 7 was announced we decided to do a special hack day to celebrate. We sold tickets to help buy a nice catered lunch and gathered at IndyHall on Saturday to hack on new iOS 7 APIs. The event was a huge success.

One newer member wanted to help do this more often and so Tom Piarulli joined the leadership to help run what has now become known as Side Project Saturday. SPS is typically the last Saturday of the month, starting at 10am and running until about 5pm. People come and go, work on their side projects, ask questions and otherwise socialize with their fellow geeks.

Tom at a SPS right after the WWDC announcements.

At around the same time the leadership also welcomed Kotaro Fujita to help run our website and Twitter account.

Kotaro talks about his favorite tool.

Moving to the Apple Store

We are fortunate enough to have a very nice Apple Store here in Philadelphia. Sometime in 2013 I was approached by the business relations manager from the store. He came to a few meetings and introduced himself. He was really impressed with our group and offered to help us out and possibly host the meeting.

I was kind of torn. We had our start at IndyHall and while we were definitely starting to outgrow the space I didn’t want to leave. Me and Kotaro took a trip to the Apple Store to checkout the Briefing Room. The room is incredibly nice. It’s on the second floor of the store, not open to the public. It’s kind of a VIP area for larger demos and meetings. It had 5 mounted TVs, all wired up for AirPlay and sound. A huge wood table with 16 swivel chairs but plenty of space around the edges for fold up chairs. Fully laid out we could host 40-45 people and have a great AV setup to help support the speakers.

We made the move in November 2013 and it’s worked out great. The space is extremely accommodating and many of the members certainly enjoy the prestige of getting to meet in such a private venue.

Apple Store Meeting

Workshops, Suburb Side Project Saturdays, and CocoaLove

In 2014, Curtis Herbert who had already been very active in the community as well as doing some talks for us joined the leadership team and started multiple new projects.

Curtis teaching his ObjC Workshop

Firstly was CocoaLove, which started out best as I can recall as friendly outburst during my “Industry News” section while reviewing upcoming conferences. “Why don’t we have any conferences here in Philly?” — and so it began. CocoaLove is not an official child of CocoaHeads but we obviously share a lot of the same goals.

Curtis also helped spur new educational events we came to call Workshops. Typically one day, 5 hour events with paid for tickets (most money going to the speaker to help compensate them for prep time). We ran about six or so over the last year and a half, covering introductions to Objective-C and then later Swift, App Marketing, UX design, and more. Workshops are incredibly loved by our members and sell out quickly. The hardest part about running them is the custom content creation. We have some ideas on how to improve that moving forward and hope to offer more Workshops in the year ahead so stay tuned.

Marketing Workshop

And finally we have our “Suburb” edition of Side Project Saturday. The city of Philadelphia is very flat and wide, with an extended suburban layout. We have many members who live outside the city and can not always participate with our center city events. To help, we started running a “Suburb” edition of our Side Project Saturday event. These are held at the Apple Store in King of Prussia. We’ve been able to host a few and hope to do more. Again, Curtis has been very helpful in organizing this.

Videos

In 2015 we continued to evolve and expand what we offer, this time with recordings. We’ve been talking about recordings for awhile but in 2015 things started to fall into place. I’ll go into detail as to how we record in a future blog post, but put simply it’s capturing what video we pipe to the monitors and then using a lapel microphone for the speaker to capture their voice. After the meeting we match the two together and then publish to Vimeo. During the fall we also added a custom AppleTV app which streams the content as well (search for “CocoaHeads” and you’ll find it).

Video Capture Setup

Apple TV App

Book Club

Another new endeavor for 2015 was the Book Club. We started it over the summer reading through Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X and then restarted it this winter with HackingWithSwift.com. Book Club basically has members work through chapters and then meet online to discuss how it went. Over the summer we met every other week, while the winter edition has been more aggressive doing it every Monday. A big thanks to Michael Mayer for helping to run the latest Book Club season.

The Future

So it’s 2016 and things continue to look good. I’d say the biggest problem we have is that we occasionally max out of room occupancy at the Apple Store but not enough to really justify a new venue. We also recognize our website could use a lot of work to meet our high standards but it remains a fairly low priority overall.

As the main organizer I’m extremely lucky to have such great support from the members and the rest of the leadership. There is no way we could do this much work if it wasn’t for the many volunteers we have. I’m extremely proud of the community we’ve made and continue to run.

Recommendations

To those running similar meet ups a few closing recommendations:

  • Be consistent with meeting dates and locations.
  • Be willing to do a lot of personal presentations and/or MC of roundtables when other speakers are not available in the early days.
  • Don’t be afraid to shake people down for talks. Also remember it’s much easier to get them to sign up for a talk a few months from now than in a few weeks. Take advantage of that.
  • If meeting after work try to have some food and drink available. We do pizza cause it’s relatively cheap and easy. You want to feed them but remember they aren’t coming for the food. In the early days a donation jar can usually cover most of the costs, later you might need sponsorship. I’ll have more to say on that in the future.
  • Help spread the responsibilities. Even smaller things like handing the food, taking meeting notes or running the group Twitter helps turn “the group” into “our group”.
  • Have fun.